Bermuda Waterfront

Bermuda

Bermuda is a popular tourist destination in the northern Caribbean region of the Atlantic Ocean. From the state of North Carolina in the United States, Bermuda lies to the east. It was once a British colony but is now its own autonomous territory. The island is divided into nine main regions, which are known locally as parishes. Each parish boasts unique activities and attractions for tourists, from the historic St. George Parish on the eastern end of the island to the natural reserve on Sandy’s Parish in the west. The largest city in Bermuda is the capital, Hamilton.

Getting Around

Rock formations on white sand beach , Bermuda

Rock formations on white sand beach , Bermuda

Bermuda has one main airport, in Hamilton. Flights frequently arrive from American cities including Atlanta, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, Baltimore, and Toronto in Canada. The airport also offers flights to and from London.

Other people decide to stop in Bermuda while on a cruise. Ships sail from a number of eastern ports in the United States, as far north as Boston, Massachusetts. A cruise is a great way to get a taste of the local flavors while on a day trip, but most stops in Bermuda are no longer than a day or two.

While on the island of Bermuda, you can travel by bus. Coach buses connect all areas of the country to Hamilton. This mode of transportation offers air conditioning and is used by both locals and tourists. Ferries are also an option when traveling between islands, as they offer trips within the Great Sound and Hamilton Harbor. An unlimited transportation pass for either buses or ferries is available for less than $55, depending on how long you want to use it for. Without a pass, a trip on the ferry will cost you $4. Other travelers opt to rent bicycles to explore the area or take a taxi between destinations.

Things to See & Do

Beach in Horshoe bay Bermuda

Beach in Horshoe bay Bermuda

The small historic town of St. George is a popular tourist attraction, as it has been labeled a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It is known as the oldest still-inhabited settlement to be colonized by the British in the New World. The tiny, winding alleys give visitors a taste of the colonial-style British architecture typical of that era.

Other attractions include the Maritime Museum, which is located in the Royal Naval Dockyard and features historical information on what was once a naval base for the British during the American Revolution. The Bermuda Aquarium, Crystal Caves, Spittal Pond, and Devil’s Hole Aquarium in Hamilton are some of the other things to see while in Bermuda.

Water sports are also a hit with travelers. Bermuda offers a wide array of options, including swimming in tropical waters, snorkeling, scuba diving, and boating. On land, Bermuda has some lovely golf courses all over the country.

Bermuda Islands Beach

Bermuda Islands Beach

Food & Drink

Bermuda Rooftops

Bermuda Rooftops

Common dishes in Bermuda include seafood, such as salty codfish, shark hash, and fish cakes. The food menus also have an obvious British influence, with hot cross buns and pies available at bakeries across the country. British pubs are also common across the islands.

If you’re interested in fine dining with a sampling of Bermudan cuisine, there are a lot of options as tourism is a large industry in the country. There are excellent restaurants all over the islands, with the most found in the capital city. Most hotels also have a restaurant, although the menus at hotel restaurants are usually more expensive. Since most cruise ships sailing in the region make at least one stop in Bermuda, high-end restaurants are often located next to the harbor.

Most tourists who visit Bermuda are also looking for an opportunity to unwind by sampling the local flavors of alcohol. Bermuda is known for two sweet alcoholic beverages: the Rum Swizzle and the Dark n’ Stormy.